Foods that never go bad


PDA
matthewdanger
03-04-2003, 09:24 PM
I read that honey will never go bad. I thought this was very interesting and wondered if there were any more of these wonderfoods.

Do you know of any more foods that will never go bad? Could be good to know if the SHTF.

Matt

If you enjoyed reading about "Foods that never go bad" here in the FamilyFriendsFirearms.com archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join FamilyFriendsFirearms.com today for the full version!
s2babe
03-04-2003, 09:44 PM
cured meats (aka-jerky) will last a long time, if they are sealed to keep out mold and stuff.:loveyes:
most canned foods also have long shelf lives.
supposedly those vacuum packing thingies help to extend the life of your food.:dunno:

Ramangel
03-04-2003, 09:46 PM
I maybe wrong but I think honey is the only food that never spoils.

Pure, natural honey will never spoil. It may crystalize but you can set the jar in warm water & it will dissolve.
You need to make sure it is pure natural honey & not honey that is blended with other things.

In addition to never spoiling, honey can also be used for first aid & cosmetics purposes. And you can make alcoholics beverages with it, like Mead.

No wonder it is called Nature's most perfect food :)

matthewdanger
03-05-2003, 10:10 AM
Thanks Folks,

Rammy, how do you use honey as a cosmetic? first aid?

Thanks
Matt

Ramangel
03-05-2003, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by matthewdanger

Rammy, how do you use honey as a cosmetic? first aid?

Honey has been used to treat cuts & burns hundreds, maybe even thousands, of years. It promotes healing & helps prevent scarring. It has anti-bacterial properties, antioxidants. I doubt if they knew that back then but they knew it worked so they used it.:D

It can be taken to boost your overall health as it gives you energy & helps boost the immune system..

My granny used to add honey to warm water & drink it, she said it helped soothe sore throats. She swore it helped her ulcers too.

Honey attracts and retains moisture so it is often used as a cosmetic. In fact lots of commercial products contain honey or beeswax. Lipstick is one of them, beeswax is used as the base.
You can use it in place of chap stick, just rub a little on your lips. You can make a paste out of honey & oatmeal then use it to scrub your face. It is a great exfoliant.
You can massage it into your hands to soften them. Be sure & rinse it off though. :D

Can also be used as a hair conditioner. You can use it full strength & leave it on for 30 minutes before rinsing for a deep conditioning, Or you can dilute with water & use it as a rinse after you shampoo. It will make your hair shine.

I am sure there are lots of other uses.

matthewdanger
03-05-2003, 10:54 AM
Thanks Rammy! :)

Honey is amazing!

Matt

AZ GRAMMY
03-05-2003, 11:15 AM
sugar and salt never go bad, if your honey truns hard just put the jar in warm water, it will go liquid again or use it like you would sugar. also hard candys if kept dry and air tight will keep forever.
az

bd
03-05-2003, 03:20 PM
SARDINES!


bd

Redrum
03-05-2003, 04:14 PM
Uhhh...sour cream...after all it's already bad..what's gonna happen? ...it turns sweet??? Don't think so...

BISHOP
03-05-2003, 08:53 PM
I once did an experiment and left a, once opened, jar of sour cream in the fridge.
Checking it every month or so(with taste tests), it lasted almost a year PAST the expiration date with it all comming to an end in total green fuzzyness within a week.

It could probably last much longer if it was never opened, afterall it is already sour, like it was said earlier.


Honey, when used in baking instead of sugar, will keep cookies cakes bread, ect moist longer, because honey absorbs moisture.

There is a cooking show on the Food Network called "Good Eats"

He inadvertantly does a good job completely explaining how to make preserved meats, pickles, jerky, how to properly can items, ect.

He explains WHY it works and what not to do.
His show is a 1/2 hour and will cover one topic every time.

He was on tonight(Wed) at 9pm,

Its a good show to watch even for the basic cook because he covers SO many aspects on ONE item.
And he explains everything in simple to understand words with graphics when necessary.


BISHOP

s2babe
03-05-2003, 08:58 PM
Originally posted by BISHOP
There is a cooking show on the Food Network called "Good Eats"

He inadvertantly does a good job completely explaining how to make preserved meats, pickles, jerky, how to properly can items, ect.

He explains WHY it works and what not to do.
His show is a 1/2 hour and will cover one topic every time.

He was on tonight(Wed) at 9pm,

Its a good show to watch even for the basic cook because he covers SO many aspects on ONE item.
And he explains everything in simple to understand words with graphics when necessary.


BISHOP

That show is the best! The only problem is that it makes mom mad at me b/c I just have to go straight to the kitchen and try some of the things mentioned, which usually ends up messing with her inventory, but what can I do? :dunno: :psycho:

Rabbi
03-06-2003, 12:08 AM
Oddly enough, another food that lasts for a very long time is a dairy product. Clarified butter, called GHEE on the Indian subcontinent, has been found edible in tombs 800 years old.

You melt unsalted butter, skimming off the foam, and let the white solids settle to the bottom. You then pour off the thin, clear yellow liquid and you have ghee. It is wonderful for cooking anything in my opinion, and will last just about forever without going rancid. It is the spoiling fat in butter that turns it rancid.

Doc

wendy
03-06-2003, 03:37 AM
well this is probably going to sound very scarey but here goes....
the first husband worked in a gas station and one day while cleaning behind one of the shelves he found a twinkie. It had been back there a very long time because the packaging was not of the kind that either of us remembered seeing. He opened it and it was still fresh! :OMG:

talk about preservatives! :OMG:

Redrum
03-06-2003, 04:53 AM
Originally posted by wendy
well this is probably going to sound very scarey but here goes....
the first husband worked in a gas station and one day while cleaning behind one of the shelves he found a twinkie. It had been back there a very long time because the packaging was not of the kind that either of us remembered seeing. He opened it and it was still fresh! :OMG:

talk about preservatives! :OMG:

Uhhhh...Wendy??? Good choice in getting rid of this one! He jus don't act right!!!

KMDO
03-08-2003, 05:45 AM
Good thread and I know there are a lot of foods that are very self life friendly but cnat think of them this late/early in the day!:D

USP45usp
03-10-2003, 06:58 PM
No one asked the right question to Rammy:

How do you make mead? :D :D

USP45usp

*actually, would like to know, sounds good.

matthewdanger
03-10-2003, 07:20 PM
hey yeah anyone know how to make Mead?

Matt

Ramangel
03-10-2003, 07:28 PM
USP,
I have never made Mead, I just know that you make it with honey. :D

Ramangel
03-10-2003, 07:33 PM
AS I posted above, I have not made Mead. SO you are on your own with this recipe :D

BASIC MEAD
The mead you make with this recipe will reflect the qualities of the honey you use. Consult our guide to mead and consider using a first-rate varietal honey. Because mead is fairly high in alcohol (10- to 12-percent by volume), I recommend 12-ouncebottles over 22-ounce ones.

12 to 18 pounds of grade-A honey
4 1/2 gallons of tap or bottled water
8 grams (1/4 ounce) of freeze-dried wine, champagne, or dedicated mead yeast

Note on equipment: Making mead requires essentially the same basic kit necessary to brew beer at home: primary and secondary plastic-bucket fermenters with air locks and spigots, transfer hosing, a bottle-filler tube, heavy bottles, bottle caps, bottle capper, and a bottle brush and washer. You should be able to find these items for approximately $70 total (excluding the bottles) through a home-brewing supplier, such as The Home Brewery. Bottles cost from $6 to $20 per dozen, depending on style. You might instead buy a couple of cases of beer in returnable bottles, drink the beer, and after sanitizing them! reuse those bottles, for the cost of the deposit.

All your equipment must be sanitized or sterilized before use. Ordinary unscented household bleach does the job fine. Put all the equipment (including the lid and stirring spoons) into the fermentation bucket, fill with water, and add 2 teaspoons of unscented bleach. Let it sit for 30 minutes. Drain the water through the spigot, rinse everything in hot water, and allow to air-dry.



Bring the 4 1/2 gallons of water to a boil. Well water, by the way, should be avoided because of potentially high levels of strong tasting minerals like iron. Boiling should remove harsh chlorine from municipal tap water. If you don't own a pot large enough to hold five gallons of water, boil as much as possible. You will add the remaining water to the fermenter later.

Once the water reaches a boil, remove it from the heat and stir in all of the honey. Do not boil the honey, as it reduces the aromatic quality of the finished mead.

While the honey dissolves in the water, put a cup of lukewarm (90 to 100F) water into a clean bowl. Sprinkle in the yeast and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. When the honey has been fully dissolved in the water and the pot is cool to the touch (not over 80F), pour the honey-water into the fermentation bucket and stir in the yeast mixture. Note: Cooling the honey-water should take about half an hour. This process can be accelerated with a so-called sink bath, that is, repeatedly immersing the pot in cold water in a sink or basin.

If you have not already added the full 4 1/2 gallons of water, top it off with the balance in bottled water (or tap water if you're confident of its quality).

Seal the bucket and allow the mixture to ferment for two weeks to one month. The progress of fermentation can judged by monitoring the carbon-dioxide bubbles escaping from the air lock: When they drop to one bubble every sixty seconds, fermentation has nearly concluded. Note that is only an issue during this primary fermentation; secondary fermentation has more to do with aging and mellowing and hence is more flexible. When primary fermentation has subsided, siphon the mead over to your secondary fermentation bucket and seal it. Allow one to four months aging time. Do not open the fermenter, as this risks contaminating the mead.

When you decide it has matured enough (and the mead has cleared), you will want to siphon it into sterilized bottles and cap them. Follow the same procedure as you would for home-brewed beer. My book Beer for Dummies has a detailed guide in its Chapter Ten, or consult the web site of the American Homebrewers Association.

Keep in mind that this is a recipe for still (i.e., non-carbonated) mead.

Mead typically improves with age, so the longer you can wait to open the bottles, the better.





Makes about five gallons, which should fill 53 twelve-ounce bottles.
Marty Nachel
Epicurious
March 2000

Allen Keys
03-13-2003, 11:06 PM
Hey...is whiskey considered food? How 'bout vodka?

Ramangel
03-13-2003, 11:10 PM
Allen,
I consider them medicines, not food. Some medicines have the best effect when taken internally. :lol:

If you enjoyed reading about "Foods that never go bad" here in the FamilyFriendsFirearms.com archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join FamilyFriendsFirearms.com today for the full version!