Home-grown gun bluing


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MtJerry
07-21-2005, 01:21 PM
I found this excellent article about home gun bluing today and thought I would share. The writer is talking about a levergun he is restoring. Scroll down to the part about re-bluing some of the parts.

I think this might come in handy for me this winter.

http://www.beartoothbullets.com/tech_notes/archive_tech_notes.htm/58

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texasalien
07-21-2005, 09:34 PM
[QUOTE=MtJerry]I think this might come in handy for me this winter.

No kidding! I have been wanting to refinish something but the process has always seemed to be so complicated I could not see doing it. I will be on the lookout for a well-worn Mak or CZ 52 and give this a try. :D

Wayne the Shrink
07-22-2005, 06:20 AM
Niter bluing is as easy as he has described it, and if you melt lead you can do this. A little research into temperatures and a lead thermometer and you can accomplish a number of colors. 'Straw' is the gold color on my Mauser, done in this way. If you've done blacksmithing, just think of the colors the steel goes through when tempering. You are essentially freezing these colors into the steel when you quench at that temp.

GAU-2
07-22-2005, 09:44 AM
Wayne, what are the actual temperatures needed to convert Potassium Nitrate to a li8quid state? Seems like it'd be well above the ~300 degrees of standard hot salt bluing?

Sincerely,
GAU-2

MtJerry
07-22-2005, 09:48 AM
Wayne, what are the actual temperatures needed to convert Potassium Nitrate to a li8quid state? Seems like it'd be well above the ~300 degrees of standard hot salt bluing?

Sincerely,
GAU-2


Good question ... do you know the temps for the various color stages as well? That would be usefull information to me as well.

Old Soldier
07-22-2005, 10:27 AM
Well all my blueing was done at between 182 and 192 degrees.




:psycho: :psycho:

GAU-2
07-22-2005, 03:46 PM
182-192 is Parkerizing OS! :p I can already DO that..... :p have a "home blue" formula using Ammonium Nitrate and Lye, but it's caustic as all hell, and it's finicky. But, it does work. Operating temp is right around 290 degrees Farenheit.

formula for it is 2.5# ammonim nitrate to 5 # lye to 1 gallon distilled water. MIX OUTSIDE, AVOID VAPORS LIKE NUCLEAR FALLOUT! After the ammonia gassing is over, it's not "too" bad, STILL avoid breathing it at all costs.

Sincerely,
GAU-2

si6
07-22-2005, 07:53 PM
Kenny..

I take it that you have "inhailed" a bit

Old Soldier
07-22-2005, 08:14 PM
Sorry about that it should be 282 to 292





:psycho: :psycho:

Wayne the Shrink
07-23-2005, 09:38 AM
I don't know the actual temps. I did this before I got the casting thermometer, but yes, it's more than hot blueing. You are talking, I'd guess, in excess of 500 degrees F. Look on metalurgy or blacksmithing websites for the general temp ranges you need, but be aware that the precise temperature for a color changes with the alloy. You are best eyeballing it and what you see is what you get. If you don't like it, put it back in and try again. It's doable on a Coleman stove.

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