Feral Hogs? In Indiana?


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Joshua M. Smith
09-04-2008, 02:06 PM
Hello,

From the Indiana hunting guide:

Feral Hog
Reporting
Populations of feral (or wild, free-ranging)
swine have been a problem in pockets around
the state in the past. In addition to being a
disease/predatory threat to Indiana livestock
and poultry production, they are known to
cause damage to crops and native plants and are
detrimental to native wildlife and their habitats.
As part of a risk assessment program, the
Indiana State Board of Animal Health (BOAH)
is asking hunters who spot or take a feral hog
to report the animal to the agency. Reports will
help BOAH and DNR determine if additional
census, disease monitoring and/or control steps
are necessary.
Anyone who sees or takes a feral hog
should call BOAH at (877) 747-3038 or
email: animalhealth@boah.IN.gov to report
the approximate location, number, sex and
estimated size of the animal(s).

Has anyone seen these? I take it they can be hunted any time. Where did they come from? Are they farm escapees or what?

I've never hog hunted and frankly, I don't see feral hogs as a bad thing.

How would one go about hog hunting? Would a .45acp work, or should I use a rifle or shotgun, if I should be able to even find these critters?

Josh <><

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OFallon
09-04-2008, 02:37 PM
Have Gun - Will Travel
Wire Fallon
Grosse Pointe, Michigan

Nes
09-04-2008, 02:39 PM
I would not hunt hogs with a 45 acp. I would use a rifle. Not saying you can't do it just saying not me. :D :D :D :D :D

Marinesg1012
09-04-2008, 02:49 PM
That is a deer rifle/slug gun proposition, from what I understand hogs can be very tough and they are built like tanks. I am planning a hunt in the near future and it seems like a deer rifle with good bullets are what to bring.

OFallon
09-04-2008, 03:16 PM
A moose catches you in the woods, he will do his level best to kill you. He will stomp you into the ground.

A pig will slice you, dice you and eat you, bones and all... and not necessarily after you die. And that's just hogs... Russian boar are that way and the size of a Volkswagen to boot!

Nes
09-04-2008, 03:18 PM
A moose catches you in the woods, he will do his level best to kill you. He will stomp you into the ground.

A pig will slice you, dice you and eat you, bones and all... and not necessarily after you die. And that's just hogs... Russian boar are that way and the size of a Volkswagen to boot!


Yup. And we have some over 200 lbs. here. My little girl friend at the lake got one. Her dad was there to back her. :up: :up: :up: :up: :up:

Joshua M. Smith
09-04-2008, 03:37 PM
I've read about Mr. Camp and others using hot 9mm on up down in TX. Granted, those may be smaller than what we have here - I don't know. I've not seen any sign up north here yet. As I understand it they're still pretty much in Southern Indiana, but I'm gettin' ready.

I figure the SKS will work for a primary and the .45acp loaded with ball, for a secondary.

Do these feral hogs have that tough gristle collar? I was charged by a domestic boar while I was helping farmers in my youth, and sidestepped like I had been told. It worked beautifully.

I know nothing about hog sign. If anyone can help with that, I'd be most appreciative.

Thanks,

Josh <><

Marinesg1012
09-04-2008, 03:38 PM
Josh hogs have the armor plate on their shoulders, if you want to hit them in the shoulder you need a really tough bullet, if not you need to get the heart shot right behind the plate and up into the far shoulder.

Nes
09-04-2008, 03:55 PM
The girl up at the lake got hers with an sks.

Marinesg1012
09-04-2008, 04:00 PM
I have a pic of a pig a guy killed with the 17HMR but I dont know if I would use it on a daily basis......

Nes
09-04-2008, 04:02 PM
Her dad was carrying an 06.

Marinesg1012
09-04-2008, 04:04 PM
Another forum had a guy that used his 556 M4 to kill them with the win power points but he ussualy had to put a few rounds into them.

Nes
09-04-2008, 04:07 PM
I learn alot here.:up: :up: Me and the folks I hunt with use 30-30, 30-06, 270, 243, shotguns and 357 mag and 44 mag hand guns. They like to never talked me into my 22-250 and its now my favorite rifle. Its fun and interesting to see the different ideas and different cal's used other places and for game we don't have here. :up: :up: :up:

Marinesg1012
09-04-2008, 04:09 PM
Where I grew up you used a 30-06 and 180 grain bullets for deer, and everything else.... when I started using 150's in my 30-06 my dad laughed at me. So many people use so many different guns to kill the same game, and they all work great where they are at. Right now I am searching for a smaller bolt action rifle for the GF, I am pretty much settled on a M700 in 7mm-08. I doubt I will be able to find that ammo anywhere but online.....

EssPete
09-04-2008, 05:52 PM
I've heard of good success with SKS with the Barnaul JSP's. I've seen some fellahs cast their own with gas checks but this is on the interweb. Ohio has hogs but its southern ohio so your northen style may be too far north just yet.

Nes
09-04-2008, 06:11 PM
As A kid I thought they only made 3 rifle cal. 22--30-30 and 30-06. :D :D :D

Gravedigger
09-04-2008, 06:49 PM
A cornered one or a wounded,or a momma with piglets,things
can get interesting real quick.They can get dangerous.
Study them.Learn their habits.
Then,go git em.

jimfox
09-04-2008, 06:53 PM
Last hog I killed was with a .45 ACP. It was what I had when the young boar and I met up. I wouldn't recommend hunting with one.

30/30 in a lever action would be a nice handy gun to use. .357 mag with heavy bullets would be a minimum in my opinion, although the same round in a rifle would be even more better. Couple of guys near Longview, Texas killed one that weighed nearly 800 pounds with a .357 rifle.

eljay
09-04-2008, 07:15 PM
Last hog I killed was with a .45 ACP. It was what I had when the young boar and I met up. I wouldn't recommend hunting with one.

30/30 in a lever action would be a nice handy gun to use. .357 mag with heavy bullets would be a minimum in my opinion, although the same round in a rifle would be even more better. Couple of guys near Longview, Texas killed one that weighed nearly 800 pounds with a .357 rifle.

All the ranchers in West Texas that my son knows use 94's in .44 Mag, so that's what I bought for them. They exist in the places on two sides of me, and it's probably only a matter of time before I see them.

Nice thing about the 94 in .44 Mag, you have an even dozen rounds full up, and what I hear, you have to hit them, wait for them to get back up, then hit them again. It's what I plan to do if they come on my place, and wouldn't consider anything smaller.

David

ExSniper
09-04-2008, 07:34 PM
http://www.texasboars.com/articles/facts.html

A lot of good info here.

Popeye
09-04-2008, 10:54 PM
I use a Stainless Ruger Super Blackhawk with a 7.5" barrel and chambered in .44 Magnum. The revolver sports a trigger job, custom grips, Millett sights and rifle style Mag-na-Porting.

I use a 305 gr, hardcast bullet, moving at about 1450 fps at the muzzle. Most of my shots are within 40 yards. I aim for the shoulder, a large bone mass. If I do my part correctly the large, fast and hard bullet smashes the shoulder and the bone does most of the damage. They tend to die rather quickly.

I copy bow hunters and ambush hunt. First you figure out where they are. Next you figure out where they will be. Then you get there first and wait.

eljay
09-04-2008, 11:11 PM
I use a Stainless Ruger Super Blackhawk with a 7.5" barrel and chambered in .44 Magnum. The revolver sports a trigger job, custom grips, Millett sights and rifle style Mag-na-Porting.

I use a 305 gr, hardcast bullet, moving at about 1450 fps at the muzzle. Most of my shots are within 40 yards. I aim for the shoulder, a large bone mass. If I do my part correctly the large, fast and hard bullet smashes the shoulder and the bone does most of the damage. They tend to die rather quickly.

I copy bow hunters and ambush hunt. First you figure out where they are. Next you figure out where they will be. Then you get there first and wait.

That sounds like the RIGHT way to do it, but it requires a character quality I'm a bit shy on, and that's patience.

However, I don't hunt them, per se. If they come on my place (which is by no means your typical Texas ranch, I'll shoot them. And I keep that 94 .44 Mag of mine loaded with 240 gr. JSP loads. Hope that'll do, but have not had to try it yet. Since I'm not handloading, my only option would be a 240 gr. jacketed flat point, if one is available.

Popeye, do you think that would be a better choice? I don't shoot anything else with that rifle.

David

Popeye
09-04-2008, 11:33 PM
For a while Federal loaded a 300 gr hardcast projectile with a mv of around 1250 fps for the .44 Mag. If you can find some of those, they will do the job. I promise.

They came in 20 round boxes. If I remember correctly, they were listed/advertised as "Hunting Loads".

Winchester also loaded a premium 270 gr semi jacketed projectile. It should work too.

theimp98
09-05-2008, 01:05 AM
i tend to use 30-30 on the ones that show up in my back yard.

Joshua M. Smith
09-05-2008, 02:21 AM
Imp,

Are you in Northern Ohio or Southern Ohio?

I'm thinking I may be up just a bit far north in Indiana for them to have ranged up this far yet - I've certainly seen no sign, but then again, I've not looked either.

Josh <><

theimp98
09-05-2008, 03:34 AM
i live in the north-east/central
not many people around me. twice i have seen wild hogs in my garden. The map does not have my area marked. but the 2 i shot where not fat pink pigs. maybe i should shot them a email. Ohio has a shoot on sight for wild pigs

I am a couple of countries north of where there top mark is.

http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/Home/hunting__trapping/HuntingandTrappingSubhomePage/WildBoarHuntingInformation/tabid/18847/Default.aspx

Joshua M. Smith
09-05-2008, 03:37 AM
Thanks... I guess they're probably further up north than sources tend to indicate.

I need a map for Indiana and can't find one.

Josh <><

wadcutter
09-05-2008, 07:13 AM
Hello,


I've never hog hunted and frankly, I don't see feral hogs as a bad thing.

How would one go about hog hunting? Would a .45acp work, or should I use a rifle or shotgun, if I should be able to even find these critters?

Josh <><

They're coming in to southern Iowa and the Iowa DNR says shoot them on site. No season, no license, no limit, just shoot them.

They are a farmer's nightmare because they feed in packs and will destroy a field in a night of feeding. They are almost impossible to wipe out. If you shoot them, the rest run and hide in the woods. The DNR has changed their tactics to trying to net whole herds. Good luck with that!

How to hunt them? Good luck. They are very elusive. Try and spot herds feeding and hope you can stalk them. Make sure you ain't shooting farmer Jone's prize Duroc or Poland Chinas. He'd take a dim view of that and might make you marry one of his daughters, who might weigh more then a Duroc sow!

If I was sitting in my deer stand and saw some come buy, I'd drop a slug in to one, but I would not expect an immediate kill.

wadcutter
09-05-2008, 09:06 AM
I don't think I'd use a .45 acp to take on this porker.


http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/ll111/hantlaj/MonsterPig1.jpg

gmcfixer
09-05-2008, 09:09 AM
Feral Hogs? In Indiana?
Yup! We had extras down here so I shipped you a bunch of them UPS :D :D :D

Dave Z

OFallon
09-05-2008, 09:21 AM
Anything that wants to eat me gets the really big bullets! A .45acp might do it, but given the pigs tusks are 6" long and he snaps his jaws like a trap - and wants nothing more than to eat you... I'd go with a bigger gun.

As for bow - use a tree stand that's well attached. And bring big broadheads with large cutting swath abilities.

jimfox
09-05-2008, 09:45 AM
Anything that wants to eat me gets the really big bullets! A .45acp might do it, but given the pigs tusks are 6" long and he snaps his jaws like a trap - and wants nothing more than to eat you... I'd go with a bigger gun.

As for bow - use a tree stand that's well attached. And bring big broadheads with large cutting swath abilities.
OFallon - Clue me in on where these bad a$$ porkers hang out so I can avoid that location. :P

OFallon
09-05-2008, 10:05 AM
The most aggressive I ever saw were Russians, on a farm up in northern Alabama, near New Market, north of Putnam Mountain. Feral domestics were the worst in Central West Virginia. Now, don't get me wrong... I don't go from state to state testing pig populations, so there may be other super pigs... but these were my experiences. By the way, if you ever have hung around pigs much (my very early young life) you learn that they can be quite aggressive... even the cutesy pink piggies!

Marinesg1012
09-05-2008, 10:09 AM
when those piggies get a little aggressive the dog jumps in the pen and straightens them out, she loves getting a mouth full of pig. The only reason I wish I lived down south was to get into pig hunting more.

Popeye
09-05-2008, 10:09 AM
Attitude is to be expected.

jimfox
09-05-2008, 10:24 AM
OFallon - I grew up in rural Louisiana in the days before fence laws and in an area where a good many folks "had a mark in the woods". I do respect hogs - they are intelligent and the feral varity are usually fast, tough and can be very dangerous when cornered. I just hadn't run accross any that were quite as focused as the ones you describe. :)

And now I know the locations to avoid those focused porkers. :up:

OFallon
09-05-2008, 10:32 AM
Well... I may stretch the description a bit; however, a Russian or Razorback usually charges a perceived aggressor. That has been my experience and why I would fear falling down.

p.s. That's why spear hunting or knife hunting these agents from hell is possible.

Joshua M. Smith
09-05-2008, 03:16 PM
When I was young, one of the farmers I worked for told me that the reason they bobbed the pigs' tails was because, if one pig went and bit it, the rest would smell blood, jump the wounded pig, and eat it. Said the smell of blood drives them crazy. Is this true? If so, should I be concerned about, after shooting one, the rest of the pack (or whatever you call a bunch of pigs, forget that one) charging me?

I think that maybe I've found a reason to practice double taps with the SKS and hunt with the bayonet affixed.

I figure I'll use the SKS and carry the .45 loaded with hardball as backup. Maybe use +P for once for added penetration.

I'm excited, and will be even more so if I can find a herd or pack or whatever. I thought I was going to have to go out west in a few years to find something dangerous to hunt.

Thanks,

Josh <><

wadcutter
09-05-2008, 03:37 PM
The rancher where I used to hunt in Wyoming had hogs on his place. He said the hogs loved to kill and eat rattle snakes.

Joshua M. Smith
09-05-2008, 03:52 PM
I'd rather deal with the snakes.

And that's saying a lot.

Josh <><

jimfox
09-05-2008, 03:55 PM
Josh - I think maybe that farmer was enjoying a good story... :)

OFallon - there is a provision in the Alaska game law that allows bears to be hunted with a spear, hand held or thrown. Not many do that nowadays - but if you get bored with feral hogs, you might consider that as an option. :P

Boar (and stag) were/are hunted with a short spear and/or short sword/knife, but usually with dogs. The quarry gets backed into a tight spot and, if it shakes the dogs, will come out full bore into/through/over who ever happens to be in the way.

Actually when I was a kid that was how "free range" hogs were handled and the "hog farmers" depended heavily on their dogs. Catahoula Curs were developed for just that activity. The Catahoula and various other Curs were favored for that work, although any muscular dog with a will and some talent could get pressed into service.

Hog dogs are kind of like Bush Pilots - some are old, some are bold, but very few are old and bold. :up:

gmcfixer
09-05-2008, 05:54 PM
The only reason I wish I lived down south was to get into pig hunting more.Well they got a whole bunch of Javelins down on my daughter and son in laws property in Pecos ...... just make certain you don't mind the heat, there have been days I've checked the weather there and Bagdad and Pecos was hotter ...... sometimes the other way around but not always :D :D :D

Dave Z

maxiball
09-05-2008, 08:29 PM
When domestic stock gets loose and turns feral it breeds wild hogs.
In just a couple generations they look very different from the fat white piggy you think of when you say bacon.
They get real heavy in the front quarters and have a grissle plate about, or I should say at least, an inch thick that acts very much like armor.
I got invited on a wild boar hunt in Tennessee.
One of the party took his 6 inch Smith .44 M-29 and factory 240 grain s.p.
He had a total of 24 rounds with him.
He shot a 400 pounder Russian which only squealed and ran.
The camp we hunted on had a "you wound it you bought if" policy.
So Six gun Gary went chasing that huge pig over hills and down valleys.
At the end of the day he and the guide finally came back in a jeep dragging a very dead Ruskie hog that made a dandy mount.
I watched as the camp help skinned that critter and marveled and the .44 slugs that fell out from under the grissle plate.
He hit the thing 17 times.
Good shooting really but many of the hits were very poorly placed.
He finally killed the exhausted hog with a shot to the back of the neck.
That bullet never exited either.
I got my 300 pound Russian at 75 yards on the run with a Malin 336 in .35 Rem.
We found the fully expaned bullet in the far side grissle plate.
The bullet broke piggy's back and I gave it a finisher or insurance shot to the neck as it was very much alive and trying to run on its still operating front feet.
Feral hogs can and do quite a bit of damage.
With a RIFLE.

caneman
09-08-2008, 02:03 PM
Fifteen or twenty years ago I'd have loved to take a crack at a big hog. Afraid my mobility has deteriorated too much to go after them now. I don't think I'd care much for hunting from a nice safe elevated stand unless it was a survival situation.

Marinesg1012
09-08-2008, 02:10 PM
The tail thing is a lie, Canadian pigs dont get their tails clipped, it is just a way to tell what country the pigs are from.

when you hunt pigs with a knife or spear you have catch dogs that go in and grab the hogs, dogs like the American bulldog, the Pitbull, and the Argentinian Dogo, a couple other dogs can be catch dogs, the catch dogs work with the hounds that chase and corner the hog, once the chase dogs have them cornered you send in a couple catch dogs to grab and hold the pig, then you can either stab it and kill it or hobble it and bring it home for slaughter. This is the method I want to use one of these times, just becuase I have an American Bulldog and I would love to see these dogs work.

OFallon
09-08-2008, 02:49 PM
I suppose budroe and I will have to keep you from being eaten, eh? ;)

On the dog part: you do realize that there's a great many dead pig dogs and those that live are covered in pretty substantial scars, eh?

Next, you'll be wanting to wrassle bears! :psycho:

gmcfixer
09-08-2008, 04:49 PM
This is the method I want to use one of these times, just becuase I have an American Bulldog and I would love to see these dogs work.


Next, you'll be wanting to wrassle bears!

I can remember being that young :D :D :D

Dave Z

KMDO
09-12-2008, 07:25 AM
I wouldnt use a 45acp, my brother and i got one last year, we had been bow hunting but seeing how they were nocturnal it wasnt too easy, we are lucky we didnt get charged doing that (night hunting in thick brush), in the end we agreed it wasnt feasable to bow hunt in darkness.:D

Next trip was just getting dark and a pig ran up before we could barely put the packs down. I shot it with a 06 180G barnes X at 20 yards, it worked quite well, quartering to, broke up one shoulder joint, couldnt find the heart and busted out a couple ribs on the far side, pig ran 20 yards and fell flat dead.

Brought ruger alaskan 454 for backup, 250g x bullets. If I were using a 45 acp as back up the last round would be a 45 Super.:D

Any future hogs I will likely use a 45-70 with either hardcast WFN 400-460grain, corbon 405 belt mountin penetrator, or 300g barnes X @22-2550fps.

Best of luck, btw if you report too much to the state they will probably hire some foreign (new zeland) company to come in to destory them and not allow hunters to help as they have done multipul times out west.

the possum
09-20-2008, 10:30 AM
Boar (and stag) were/are hunted with a short spear and/or short sword/knife, but usually with dogs. The quarry gets backed into a tight spot and, if it shakes the dogs, will come out full bore into/through/over who ever happens to be in the way.


Since it was brought up, I thought I might link to some first hand accounts of hunting various game with dogs and a blade, from way back when.

http://www.fullbooks.com/The-Rifle-and-The-Hound-in-Ceylon1.html

An exerpt to whet yer appetite:


A buck! a noble fellow! Now he charges at the hounds, and
strikes the foremost beneath the water with his fore-feet; up they come
again to the surface--they hear their master's well-known shout--they
look round and see his welcome figure on the steep bank. Another moment,
a tremendous splash, and he is among his hounds, and all are swimming
towards their noble game. At them he comes with a fierce rush....

Down the river the buck now swims, sometimes galloping over the
shallows, sometimes wading shoulder-deep, sometimes swimming through the
deep pools. ...again the enraged buck turns to bay. He has this time taken a strong position: he stands in a
swift rapid about two feet deep; his thin legs cleave the stream as it
rushes past, and every hound is swept away as he attempts to stem the
current. He is a perfect picture: his nostrils are distended, his mane
is bristled up, his eyes flash, and he adds his loud bark of defiance to
the din around him. The hounds cannot touch him. Now for the huntsman's
part; he calls the stanchest seizers to his side, gives them a cheer on,
and steps into the torrent, knife in hand. Quick as lightning the buck
springs to the attack; but he has exposed himself, and at that moment
the tall lurchers are upon his ears; the huntsman leaps upon one side
and plunges the knife behind his shoulder. A tremendous struggle takes
place--the whole pack is upon him; still his dying efforts almost free
him from their hold: a mass of spray envelopes the whole scene. Suddenly
he falls--he dies--it is all over. The hounds are called off, and are
carefully examined for wounds.

Popeye
09-20-2008, 11:03 AM
There is an inactive member of this board, a knife maker, who posted about hunting wild pigs with only a knife, pictures were included.. It was a while ago but I'm sure the thread will turn up as the result of a search.

jimfox
09-20-2008, 11:06 AM
Since it was brought up, I thought I might link to some first hand accounts of hunting various game with dogs and a blade, from way back when.

http://www.fullbooks.com/The-Rifle-and-The-Hound-in-Ceylon1.html

An exerpt to whet yer appetite:

[/FONT]
Whoooeee - after that baiting I bet a couple of loin chops frying in the kitchen would clear the whole castle.

Dogs were used pretty exclusively for deer when I was a youngun. If the deer was killed right when jumped the meat was as fine a taste as you could ask for. If he'd been in front of the dogs for a while before being killed them chops could have a whole lot of tang...

Marinesg1012
09-20-2008, 11:17 AM
I suppose budroe and I will have to keep you from being eaten, eh? ;)

On the dog part: you do realize that there's a great many dead pig dogs and those that live are covered in pretty substantial scars, eh?

Next, you'll be wanting to wrassle bears! :psycho:


I know a lot of dogs are seriously hurt, and some are killed. But to see the dogs doing something they love is beautiful if you ask me. Some may call it barbaric becuase the dogs are catching the pigs, but that is what kept a lot of farmers alive for a lot of years. My dog will jump a 4 foot fence to get into it with the domestic pigs, and she has never been "trained" to do it. I would like to find a place down south where I could bring her and get her on a penned wild pig. and maybe get her into a real pig.

Paul me and the 6.8 M4 will keep you and budroe safe out there in the wild woods of texas ;)

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